The African-American subcommittee seeks to bolster awareness about and build support for academic and athletic programs at Carolina, with special emphasis on initiatives that support and promote a vibrant multicultural campus environment. The subcommittee also identifies and encourages leadership opportunities for diverse alumni who wish to become more active in the life of the University.


Christopher Riddick
Christopher Riddick

Christopher Riddick chairs the African-American Subcommittee

Christopher Riddick Riddick works as a management consultant with Booz Allen Hamilton where he focuses on change management and human capital engagements for a variety of federal government agencies. Also, he serves as a grant reviewer for the District of Columbia Office of the State Superintendent of Education. On ACRED, Riddick chairs the African-American subcommittee and is responsible for assisting with university fundraising efforts.

Riddick is a founding member of the board of directors of the Grassroots Education Project, a Washington, DC-based nonprofit organization focused on strengthening relationships between neighborhood schools and their surrounding communities. He also served as the vice chair of the founding board of directors of Somerset Prep DC Public Charter School. Riddick is a proud alumnus of Education Pioneers, serving as a summer 2009 fellow in Washington, DC, an inaugural member of the EP DC Metro alumni board in 2011, and chair of the board in 2012.

Lucrecia Moore
Lucrecia Moore

Lucrecia Moore vice chairs the African-American Subcommittee

Lucrecia Moore is the Senior Vice President and Associate General Counsel of Bank of America Merchant Services. She holds a BA degree in English from UNC and a JD from Marquette University Law School. In addition to serving as vice chair of the African-American subcommittee for ACRED, Moore is also a member of the General Alumni Association. She is the Chairman of the Board of Directors for the Shalom Project in her hometown of Winston-Salem, NC. In addition, she was recognized as the first attorney at BB&T to participate in the Leadership Council on Legal Diversity (LCLD) Fellows Program. Also, Moore is a Certified Long Distance Running Coach and a triathlete. She lives in Charlotte, N.C.

Global citizenship is an integral component of UNC’s premier academic core, and our Asian alumni contribute significantly to Carolina’s growth as a global University. We are committed to strengthening Asian alumni ties to the University as well as developing lasting relationships with the growing Asian student population. Asia is one of UNC’s most prolific academic partners, and we are working to expand opportunities for our alumni, especially those abroad, to play an active role in our students’ lives, as well as their learning.


Rhesa Versola chairs the Asian/Asian American Subcommittee

Rhesa Versola earned her BA in Journalism from UNC. She is actively involved with the UNC Diversity Program for Minority Journalists, as well as ACRED. Versola, a former newspaper journalist turned clinical research director, is taking a sabbatical from her career to experience life first hand as a breast cancer warrior. She resides in Pittsboro, NC.

Ngoc Nguyen vice chairs the Asian/Asian American Subcommittee

Ngoc Nguyen
Ngoc Nguyen

Ngoc Nguyen is a Greensboro, N.C. native and the oldest of three to graduate from UNC. As an undergraduate, Nguyen was an active member of the Asian Students Association and served as vice president and president of the Vietnamese Students Association. She earned a bachelor’s degree in public policy analysis in 1994, then obtained a master’s degree in public administration from N.C. State University in 1996 and a juries doctor from North Carolina Central University in 1999.

Nguyen has served as a member of the Alumni Committee on Racial and Ethnic Diversity since its inception in 1999. She resides in Raleigh with her husband and two sons.

ccm1_036143The American Indian presence at UNC continues to grow, and our alumni are among Carolina’s most dedicated and generous supporters. The establishment of the American Indian Center and other initiatives dedicated to strengthening and promoting American Indian heritage are helping blend the richness of North Carolina’s American Indian culture with the strengths of UNC’s research, education and teaching. The American Indian Subcommittee aims to help advance the University’s role as a leader for American Indian scholarship and help secure a place for native issues in the institution’s intellectual life.


Priscilla Maynor
Priscilla Maynor

Priscilla Maynor chairs the American Indian Subcommittee

Priscilla Maynor, a native of Lumberton, NC, Maynor earned her Doctor in Education degree in Educational Leadership from UNC. Maynor is a member of the American Indian Center External Advisory Board. She is also with the School of Education’s Educational Leadership program, as an adjunct professor.
Maynor is the founder and principal of imaginEd Partners, LLC. She is also a systems-focused education strategist, facilitator and collaborator, who is recognized in national circles for her broad knowledge base and progressive leadership in public education spanning from early childhood through K-12 and higher education. As an American Indian female who was educated in mainstream schools, she has an affinity for indigenous and underserved youth who are not faring well in the current educational system. Maynor views her work as an opportunity to serve and offer her diverse and unique set of perspectives to equipping educators and leaders to innovate and make social change happen. She started imaginED Partners to serve as the catalyst for innovation to transform the educational and economic future of indigenous and underserved children, families and communities. Maynor lives in Holly Springs, N.C.

Melinda Kaiser
Melinda Kaiser

Melinda Kaiser vice chairs the American Indian Subcommittee

Melinda Kaiser has had a successful career in information technology and was most recently with IBM for 14 years.  Since leaving IBM, she has completed a project management certificate program and was selected for a 15-week Business Intelligence Data Analyst scholarship program.  Kaiser is currently exploring opportunities that will leverage her business development and analytical skills.

Her areas of support at UNC include the American Indian Center, Carolina Women’s Leadership Council Faculty Mentoring Award and University Libraries.

Carolina’s Latina/o community is one of the fastest growing groups on campus. As the Hispanic population grows in the state and, indeed, the nation, UNC seeks to ensure that advanced academic opportunities are available and encourages Latina students to pursue them.

We also want to build stronger relationships and encourage collaboration among diverse groups focused on Latina/o issues. In doing so, we aim to better serve the University community as well as the state, and forge a lasting bond not only between the University and our alumni, but also between our alumni and our students.


Virginia Cardenas chairs the Latina/o Subcommittee

Virginia Cardenas
Virginia Cardenas

Virginia Cárdenas is director of the Magnet School Assistance Program for Wake County Public Schools. She holds a master’s degree in school administration and a Ph.D. in school leadership from UNC. As a teacher, principal and school administrator, she strives to provide all children with a quality education that lays the foundation for success and global citizenship.

She is currently working to help develop systems and structures for countries to better promote and preserve their cultural heritage.

Ron Bilbao vice chairs the Latina/o Subcommittee

Ron Bilbao
Ron Bilbao

Ron Bilbao is Legislative Specialist at the Florida Education Association (FEA), Florida’s largest association of professional employees with more than 140,000 members. He is a proud Miami native of Venezuelan and Colombian heritage.

Bilbao’s passion for social justice was firmly rooted at a young age. In high school, he served as President of the Miami-Dade County Student Government Association (SGA) where he created the first student-lobbying program leading fellow students to the state capital to advocate for anti-bullying legislation and juvenile justice reform. He also led the SGA in a federal lawsuit against the Miami-Dade County School Board for banning the children’s book, Vamos a Cuba.